What to do After a Flood

Flooding can occur at any time of the year in areas all across the nation. This year’s Tropical Storm Bill is dumping inches of rain all across the midwest, hitting Texas and Oklahoma, and especially Missouri, hard.

When heavy rains hit, homeowners can be caught off guard by flooding in areas that don’t normally see rising waters.

“The damage from natural disasters like floods and hurricanes not only affects individual families but also entire communities. As Texans recover from the flooding that accompanied this latest storm, HouseLogic hopes to help homeowners across the country prepare and protect their homes and families throughout this hurricane season. In order to prepare, protect, and clean up in the aftermath of a flood, HouseLogic.com and the National Association of Realtors (NAR) offer up some resources and tips.

The first 24 hours can be key during a cleanup. It’s critical to start airing out your home as soon as you can. Moisture equals mold and rot.

To do rid your home of moisture you need to get air moving through open doors and windows. Additionally, open up closets and cabinets. Natural breezes will work their magic, but give Mother Nature a helping hand by using fans.

HouseLogic says, “Rent or buy high-powered fans to rev up air circulation. Depending on size and power, fans cost between $50 and $500 to buy; $20 a day to rent. (Do not use your central air conditioner or furnace blower if HVAC ducts were under water.)”

Humidity can also wreak havoc on a flooded zone. Move a dehumidifier into your home to help stop water vapors in their tracks.

Get rid of standing water with a sump pump or a wet/dry shop vac. The longer you allow water to sit in a basement the higher the chance that molds will begin to grow.

Need another great HouseLogic tip? Absorb moisture using desiccants such as silica gel, clay, and calcium oxide. “Place water-permeable packages of desiccants and wet items in airtight containers or in sealed areas, like closets. Some desiccants change color to indicate they are saturated, which can take days or weeks, depending on how much moisture items contain.”

Finally, there will be items that will need trashed. Some rugs and carpets will be beyond saving. It’s time to let go and get these items out of your home before they start harboring molds. Mold is not just unattractive, it’s a health hazard.

 

 

For the full article, please visit:  http://realtytimes.com/consumeradvice/homeownersadvice1/item/35800-20150619-what-to-do-after-a-flood

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